Unlimited [Philosophy Book] ô The Christians and the Fall of Rome (Great Ideas) - by Edward Gibbon Õ


  • Title: The Christians and the Fall of Rome (Great Ideas)
  • Author: Edward Gibbon
  • ISBN: 9780143036241
  • Page: 128
  • Format: Paperback

  • Throughout history, some books have changed the world They have transformed the way we see ourselves and each other They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted They have enriched lives and destroyed them Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose idThroughout history, some books have changed the world They have transformed the way we see ourselves and each other They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted They have enriched lives and destroyed them Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are.
    Edward Gibbon
    Edward Gibbon 8 May 1737 16 January 1794 was an English historian and Member of Parliament His most important work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, was published in six volumes between 1776 and 1788 The Decline and Fall is known for the quality and irony of its prose, its use of primary sources, and its open criticism of organised religion.Gibbon returned to England in June 1765 His father died in 1770, and after tending to the estate, which was by no means in good condition, there remained quite enough for Gibbon to settle fashionably in London at 7 Bentinck Street, independent of financial concerns By February 1773, he was writing in earnest, but not without the occasional self imposed distraction He took to London society quite easily, joined the better social clubs, including Dr Johnson s Literary Club, and looked in from time to time on his friend Holroyd in Sussex He succeeded Oliver Goldsmith at the Royal Academy as professor in ancient history honorary but prestigious In late 1774, he was initiated a freemason of the Premier Grand Lodge of England And, perhaps least productively in that same year, he was returned to the House of Commons for Liskeard, Cornwall through the intervention of his relative and patron, Edward Eliot He became the archetypal back bencher, benignly mute and indifferent, his support of the Whig ministry invariably automatic Gibbon s indolence in that position, perhaps fully intentional, subtracted little from the progress of his writing.After several rewrites, with Gibbon often tempted to throw away the labours of seven years, the first volume of what would become his life s major achievement, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, was published on 17 February 1776 Through 1777, the reading public eagerly consumed three editions for which Gibbon was rewarded handsomely two thirds of the profits amounting to approximately 1,000 Biographer Leslie Stephen wrote that thereafter, His fame was as rapid as it has been lasting And as regards this first volume, Some warm praise from David Hume overpaid the labour of ten years Volumes II and III appeared on 1 March 1781, eventually rising to a level with the previous volume in general esteem Volume IV was finished in June 1784 the final two were completed during a second Lausanne sojourn September 1783 to August 1787 where Gibbon reunited with his friend Deyverdun in leisurely comfort By early 1787, he was straining for the goal and with great relief the project was finished in June Gibbon later wrote It was on the day, or rather the night, of 27 June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page in a summer house in my garden I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and perhaps the establishment of my fame But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind by the idea that I had taken my everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that, whatsoever might be the future date of my history, the life of the historian must be short and precarious.Volumes IV, V, and VI finally reached the press in May 1788, their publication having been delayed since March so it could coincide with a dinner party celebrating Gibbon s 51st birthday the 8th Mounting a bandwagon of praise for the later volumes were such contemporary luminaries as Adam Smith, William Robertson, Adam Ferguson, Lord Camden, and Horace Walpole Smith remarked that Gibbon s triumph had positioned him at the very head of Europe s literary tribe.


    Commentaires:

    Charlotte Dann
    This was enlightening. I feel enlightened. Never before have I dissected elements of the Christian religion, and it kind of made me angry. Here's a video about it.

    Kevin
    An interesting little pamphlet that basically describes how the Christian Faith managed to get a foothold over the Mediterranean in Syria, Palestine and Rome, and how it then later superseded the old Polytheist Pagan beliefs, most notably with Emperor Constantine whom adopted the faith for the official Roman Empire. In fact, the title of this pamphlet is misleading; it does not go into the Fall of Rome by the Goths at all, but rather describes, using a rational analyses and hypothesis, what dist [...]

    Texbritreader
    I found this excerpt from "The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", presented as part of Penguin's Great Ideas series, to be brilliant. Gibbon addresses the rise of Christianity as a solely historical event, free of all religious belief which commonly filled historical and journalistic writings from the late 18th century.While he frankly concedes some of the attractions and merits of the early Christian church, he is unafraid to present the inner machinations and political aspec [...]

    James Badger
    I was somewhat disappointed to find that this is not really a standalone work, but rather an excerpt of Gibbon's larger and more important work on the rise and fall of the Rome.That said, I really enjoyed the precision of Gibbon's prose. I can see why this portion of his work was not particularly well-received by the Christians of the day. It reveals the reality of early Christendom: multiple fragmentary groups with no consistent theology. It shows, and quit controversially so, that the Christia [...]

    Ana Rînceanu
    Gibbon's book was banned for the crime of disrespecting the character of sacred Christian doctrine, by "treat[ing] the Christian church as a phenomenon of general history, not a special case admitting supernatural explanations and disallowing criticism of its adherents".It's precisely for this reason that he can look at early Christianity as a historical phenomenon and can create a more rounded picture of its impact on the Roman Empire.

    Alan
    While this no doubt must have been quite the book for its time - it's unadulterated articulation of early Christianity would no doubt have been considered heretical by 18th century standards - it has lost its edge in modern times. This is not to say Gibbon's writing is mundane or that the book is unimportant - far from it - but as I've mentioned, there is nothing particularly shocking in this abridged excerpt that anyone interested in early Christianity would not be aware of.

    Alasdair
    Not sure this works as a fillet from the larger work - it's too much in isolation. Needs the bigger context. Also misleading title: Gibbon doesn't suggest Christians were responsible for fall of Rome, and much of this is development of early church, not decline of Rome. Not a problem, just not what the title suggests.

    Shawn Birss
    This is a fascinating skeptic's view of the early history of the Christian church.Though unabashed racism generally and anti-semitism specifically are not unusual to find in old classics, in this one it is essential to the writer's message. His is a very high opinion of the Roman Republic, her philosophies, myths, and government, from which he claims the greatest nations of the eighteenth century have descended, the European nations of which he is a part. Against these grand nations he compares [...]

    Matt Ryall
    I've been meaning to read Gibbon's epic, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, so this excerpt provided a good way to get into it.The title is perhaps a bit misleading. Gibbon doesn't really describe any relationship between the Christians and the fall of Rome, he just talks about the early church, how it rose, and how these events coincided with changes in the late Roman empire. Still, I found this area of discussion very interesting.Despite the interesting topic, I struggled [...]

    Ashley
    Awesome.I've always had an interest in Gibbon's The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, but I'd never really thought about it. This excerpt (part of the wonderful Penguin Books Great Ideas series) may have pushed me to the point where I have to! A brilliant and logical challenge to faith and religion, written some 250 years ago, when such ideas must have still been rather scandalous. Don't get wrong, he never approaches the subject from the Atheist angle, but rather just from a rational viewpo [...]

    Liz Polding
    Interesting and probably quite shocking when first written, this charts the progress of Christianity from its early days of democratic and quiet emergence to the aggressive proselytising and hierarchical splendour of the emergent Catholic Church. Quite savage in places and particularly relevant now that the unshakable power of the church has been, well, shaken. Gibbon is fairly scathing about faith itself, but his main attack is on the church itself, with faith receiving a lesser blow as a rathe [...]

    Sara
    Some of this is brilliant and scathing, Gibbon's pretty bold in his criticism of organised religion which is admirable/entertaining to read given context. I can definitely see how Decline and Fall can take someone a good time to read through, though. Not sure if it's just due to scant sleep or genuine disinterest at times, but I found it hard to read without a bajillion breaks.

    Tony
    Gibbon writes, "In the course of this important, though perhaps tedious inquiry," I rather suspect that the book is not as important now as it was in the author's day. however the its tediousness remain undiminished. That said, there are still some useful insights, "The loss of sensual pleasure was supplied and compensated by spiritual pride"

    Valerie
    Christianity flourished in the Roman Empire because of its promise of life after death, which the pagans and Jews did not believe. It also looked after the poor, widows, and orphans through donations from members. It spread with ease through the empire because of the road system established to move Legions to the far corners of the empire.

    Amber Berry
    I'm not sure how this got onto my library "for later" bookshelf, but I borrowed it. It's a slim volume, and that could be deceptive. I've sometimes thought I should read Gibbon, so this may be my chance.

    Kevin K
    A good sampling of Gibbon on the development of Christianity in the Roman Empire. Unfortunately the excerpt doesn't discuss Christianity as a contributing factor to the fall of Rome, as you would expect from the title.

    Ashley Rindsberg
    Gibbon got style.

    • Unlimited [Philosophy Book] ô The Christians and the Fall of Rome (Great Ideas) - by Edward Gibbon Õ
      128 Edward Gibbon
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Philosophy Book] ô The Christians and the Fall of Rome (Great Ideas) - by Edward Gibbon Õ
      Posted by:Edward Gibbon
      Published :2019-01-23T21:54:08+00:00