Best Download [Carmen Gimenez Smith] ☆ Milk and Filth || [Fiction Book] PDF È


  • Title: Milk and Filth
  • Author: Carmen Gimenez Smith
  • ISBN: 9780816521166
  • Page: 491
  • Format: Paperback

  • Adding to the Latina tradition, Carmen Gim nez Smith, politically aware and feminist oriented, focuses on general cultural references rather than a sentimental personal narrative She speaks of sexual politics and family in a fierce, determined tone voracious in its opinions about freedom and responsibility The author engages in mythology and art history, musically wooAdding to the Latina tradition, Carmen Gim nez Smith, politically aware and feminist oriented, focuses on general cultural references rather than a sentimental personal narrative She speaks of sexual politics and family in a fierce, determined tone voracious in its opinions about freedom and responsibility The author engages in mythology and art history, musically wooing the reader with texture and voice As she references such disparate cultural figures as filmmaker Lars Von Trier, Annie from the film Annie Get Your Gun, Nabokov s Lolita, facebook entries and Greek gods, they appear as part of the poet s cultural critique Phrases such as the caustic domain of urchins and the gelatin shiver of tea s surface take the poems from lyrical images to comic humor to angry, intense commentary On writing about downgrading into human, she says, Then what Amorality, osteoporosis and not even a marble estuary for the ages Gim nez Smith s poetic arsenal includes rapier sharp wordplay mixed with humor, at times self deprecating, at others an ironic comment on the postmodern world, all interwoven with imaginative language of unexpected force and surreal beauty Revealing a long view of gender issues and civil rights, the author presents a clever, comic perspective Her poems take the reader to unusual places as she uses rhythm, images, and emotion to reveal the narrator s personality Deftly blending a variety of tones and styles, Gim nez Smith s poems offer a daring and evocative look at deep cultural issues.
    Carmen Gimenez Smith
    Formerly a Teaching Writing Fellow at the University of Iowa, Carmen Gimenez Smith is now an assistant professor of creative writing at New Mexico State University, the publisher of Noemi Press, and the editor in chief of PUERTO DEL SOL Her work has most recently appeared in MANDORLA, COLORADO REVIEW and PLOUGHSHARES and is forthcoming in jubilat and DENVER QUARTERLY She is the author of ODALISQUE IN PIECES University of Arizona Press, 2009 and BRING DOWN THE LITTLE BIRDS University of Arizona, 2010 She lives in Las Cruces, New Mexico with her husband and their two children.


    Commentaires:

    Rosebud Ben-Oni
    You'll need a cigarette after you read the whole damn thing. It is that good.

    Sonya Huber
    I read this book in one breathless sitting, and I felt like a changed person after reading it. The lines and perspectives, and the honesty, worm their way into one's mind, and I felt the way I used to feel as an undergraduate, reading works that I wanted to keep near me and slip into my backpack. I'm not a poet, and I don't know what forms she's working in, but it didn't matter; the language was vivid and challenging, but never felt as though she was writing to impress with wordplay. I have so m [...]

    Rebecca
    These poems could be subtitled "How to be a woman," because they are full of the kind of beautiful, hard, luminous truths that women experience. And you don't have to love poetry to love this collection of poems. This will become a feminist classic, I hope. The standout poems for me were the 8-page "Parts of an Autobiography," "Feminine Agency," and "Something New," which I wrote about on my poetry blog, Structure and Style.

    Loretta
    As an undergraduate with a major in Women’s Studies, second wave feminism was at the core of my education. I read theory by white American feminists from Betty Friedan, all the way up to Susan Faludi. In classes, I watched the original 1979 film, Killing Us Softly and several of the updated versions throughout my years of coursework. Writers such as Adrienne Rich and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick had a lasting impact on my writing and fostered in me a desire to critique binary representations, hegemon [...]

    Sarah
    I hugged this book the first time when Smith wanted to garrote Lars von Trier. I hugged it again when my second copy came in the mail--a kind gift from a stranger after a school secretary threw out (threw out!) my first copy. I hugged it again when I finished it. Yes to the body imagery, yes to the happy jiggly tummy, yes to the mythic characters, yes to Joan Rivers. Go forth and read, peeps.

    Matt
    I really liked the expressive mythopoetic creative story telling here. I wanted a little more poetry, though-- I felt like "Parts of an Autobiography" especially didn't quite do enough with language. But that's definitely my own response. There is a ton here to like, even if it is sometimes more document-testimony than lyric.

    Maud
    some poems so dirty - bloody and messy - and some so glittering. it's what I wish I could write. mystical while staying grounded in history. there are quite a few references that I think went over my head (a series of stanzas based on Joan Rivers jokes?) but even those were enjoyable and fun.

    Kayla
    The third section of poems hit me hard and left me breathless. I want these words to sit in my heart. What a woman.

    secondwomn
    a lot of raw craft

    Melissa
    "What is done out of fear smells like devotion and patriarchy." Didn't love every poem, but there were some real gems. Quote above is from "Epigrams for a Lady."

    Barbara
    Brilliant--I wish I'd written it. Smart, politically aware, in love with vocabulary

    Gabriel Clarke
    A challenging one. Dense, theoretically informed but still visceral, explicitly feminist, challenging. But it was the language and ferocity of the best of these poems that had me returning to the beginning of every third or fourth one. Not entirely successful but the risks that pay off justify the occasional rhetorical overreach.

    Colin
    "When God was a woman, / empire was meh."

    Hannah
    There is a lot of beautiful language and surprising phrasing in these poems, but ultimately, I just didn't get anything from most of these. It felt like clever phrase after clever phrase, saying the same thing, and never really meaning enough. The endings didn't feel true - I often turned the page expecting the poem to continue, only to find the next poem.

    Milo
    "She constructs a manlimb by limb from the earth,and he belongs to us,so we tear him apartbecause he belongs to us."- from "(The Red Lady)"

    Dearwassily
    I didn't love this--though there were parts of it I loved--but am interested in checking out more by the writer.

    Marissa
    Parts of an Autobiography: " I want to make explosions in the air like Cai Guo-Quiang, except with language."

    • Best Download [Carmen Gimenez Smith] ☆ Milk and Filth || [Fiction Book] PDF È
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    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Carmen Gimenez Smith] ☆ Milk and Filth || [Fiction Book] PDF È
      Posted by:Carmen Gimenez Smith
      Published :2019-02-16T23:32:19+00:00