↠ China's Last Empire: The Great Qing || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ William T. Rowe Timothy Brook


  • Title: China's Last Empire: The Great Qing
  • Author: William T. Rowe Timothy Brook
  • ISBN: 9780674066243
  • Page: 114
  • Format: Paperback

  • In a brisk revisionist history, William Rowe challenges the standard narrative of Qing China as a decadent, inward looking state that failed to keep pace with the modern West.The Great Qing was the second major Chinese empire ruled by foreigners Three strong Manchu emperors worked diligently to secure an alliance with the conquered Ming gentry, though many of their socialIn a brisk revisionist history, William Rowe challenges the standard narrative of Qing China as a decadent, inward looking state that failed to keep pace with the modern West.The Great Qing was the second major Chinese empire ruled by foreigners Three strong Manchu emperors worked diligently to secure an alliance with the conquered Ming gentry, though many of their social edicts especially the requirement that ethnic Han men wear queues were fiercely resisted As advocates of a universal empire, Qing rulers also achieved an enormous expansion of the Chinese realm over the course of three centuries, including the conquest and incorporation of Turkic and Tibetan peoples in the west, vast migration into the southwest, and the colonization of Taiwan Despite this geographic range and the accompanying social and economic complexity, the Qing ideal of small government worked well when outside threats were minimal But the nineteenth century Opium Wars forced China to become a player in a predatory international contest involving Western powers, while the devastating uprisings of the Taiping and Boxer rebellions signaled an urgent need for internal reform Comprehensive state mandated changes during the early twentieth century were not enough to hold back the nationalist tide of 1911, but they provided a new foundation for the Republican and Communist states that would follow This original, thought provoking history of China s last empire is a must read for understanding the challenges facing China today.
    William T. Rowe Timothy Brook
    William T Rowe is an historian of China, and John and Diane Cooke Professor of Chinese History, Department of History, The Johns Hopkins University.


    Commentaires:

    Hadrian
    A sound introduction to the much-maligned Qing dynasty.A popular perception, at least from some mainlanders, is that the Qing were an inherently corrupt and decrepit set of foreign invaders, doomed to fail immediately. Doctor Rowe instead notes that there may have been no such unified group of 'Manchus' in the 1600s, instead various groups in the northeast which were somewhat sinicized, and some more nomadic than others. Such is the amorphous nature of 'race'. Nevertheless, the idea of a unified [...]

    Hayward Chan
    I am intrigued with Qing's history ever since I was small. Starting from kids book in Chinese, I read more and more about it. I thought I knew most minute details, events and even anecdotes of Qing. That said, I am no historian. Educated in Hong Kong, the sinocentric nationalist narrative shapes my understanding about Chinese history, like the vast majority of (ethnic Chinese) Hong Kong students. I heard about an alternative narrative "New Qing History" which gets more and more coverage due to t [...]

    Tim C
    This is an absolutely excellent book! It covers a vast period and very capably examines many diverse historiographical themes in a relatively slim volume. It's written with exceptional clarity (even though I found myself tripping over and having to re-read the occasional, unfamiliar 'Americanism' here and there) and is even quite pacy in parts. It provided a good overview of certain events, and provided a clear and balanced discussion on its main 'revisionist' points, with a great bibliography f [...]

    Sean Mccarrey
    This book covers the epic history of the Qing Empire from bloody start to bloody finish. It does an excellent job of getting the nitty gritty without missing out on the big picture of things. The only issue I had was that the material could be quite dense in some areas. Maybe a little less on the views of the numerous scholars and literati and a bit more on the history of daily life and the incredible events of the various rebellions that occurred.

    Mary Catelli
    Another author, another structure -- I didn't like it as well as the previous ones, perhaps just wasn't as interested.

    Patrick
    Before reading this book, my knowledge of Qing dynasty history had been elementary. I had only read about it in greater histories of Chinese history or as a background for modern Chinese history. Rowe's history of the Qing is a fascinating revisionist take on not only the dynasty by all of imperial China. He posits and shows that the Qing dynasty was quite remarkably different from all past dynasties and that many of the Qing dynasty's policies and problems have resurfaced and caused problems fo [...]

    Jonathan
    In this, the final book in the series of histories of Imperial China, Professor Rowe challenges the standard narrative of Qing China as an inward-looking state that failed to keep pace with the modern west. This was a dynasty of foreigners: invaders from Manchuria. The early Manchu emperors expanded China's boundaries to and even beyond the modern borders and the country continued developing economically. However the 19th century Opium wars forced China to become a player in a predatory internat [...]

    Margaret Sankey
    Part of the outstanding History of Imperial China series, this is a relatively compact explication of the rise and fall of the Qing. I was particularly interested in how the incoming dynasty coped with the many problems of the late Ming (which my 312 class always seems to be able to make worse) and then the rise of the Europeans--Rowe handily explains the Qing economy and the dramatic shift in the values of copper and silver, the workings of the exam system and its vast bureaucracy, the salt tax [...]

    Marlo
    I learned a lot! But perhaps you can see from how long it took me to read a mere 287 pages (over a month), I found it dry and dense at times. This is as much a fault of mine as it is the author's, because I often find non-fiction tough to get into. I also expected more of a play-by-play of events, but this is more of a sophisticated study than just a telling of what happened, and I appreciate that.

    Lloyd
    The Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) was the last imperial regime in China, and therefore the one that is blamed for the misfortunes that befell the country from the Opium Wars forward. But the Qing were, Rowe argues, more energetic, muscular, and relevant than they are given credit for. In doing so, however, he gives equal time to views of other historians, both past and present. Intellectually honest, clearly written - very worthwhile.

    Jeremy Hurdis
    A fairly straightforward history, this book is interesting because it provides a rich account of the tireless Qing emperor as he attempted to unify, solidify, and expand the Chinese border, constantly engaging in mediation between the culture and politics of Han-Chinese and Manchu elites. The active engagement in politics contradicts earlier perceptions of the Qing as overly passive and weak and instead shows a series of political successes.

    Julian Haigh
    Of the five in the series this stands best along with the first and is perhaps easiest to grasp as China approaches modern times. I have become so interested in the structure of Chinese imperial past and the concept of the "Mandate of Heaven". If in fact it did exist, this book explains its last fall.

    Ayu
    I appreciated all the pictures.

    Tegin Ye
    如果是尾注就更好了,完美的清史研究综述。

    Thomson Yu
    excellent introductory book for anyone exploring the Qing history.

    • ↠ China's Last Empire: The Great Qing || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ William T. Rowe Timothy Brook
      114 William T. Rowe Timothy Brook
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ China's Last Empire: The Great Qing || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ William T. Rowe Timothy Brook
      Posted by:William T. Rowe Timothy Brook
      Published :2019-01-20T17:48:18+00:00