Free Read [Classics Book] ✓ The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue - by Manuel Muñoz Ê


  • Title: The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue
  • Author: Manuel Muñoz
  • ISBN: 9781565125322
  • Page: 380
  • Format: Paperback

  • Manuel Munoz s dazzling collection is set in a Mexican American neighborhood in central California a place where misunderstandings and secrets shape people s lives From a set of triplets with three distinct fates to a father who places his hope and life savings in the hands of a faith healer, the characters in these stories cross paths in unexpected ways As they do, theyManuel Munoz s dazzling collection is set in a Mexican American neighborhood in central California a place where misunderstandings and secrets shape people s lives From a set of triplets with three distinct fates to a father who places his hope and life savings in the hands of a faith healer, the characters in these stories cross paths in unexpected ways As they do, they reveal a community that is both embracing and unforgiving, and they discover a truth about the nature of home you always live with its history Munoz is an explosive new talent who joins the ranks of such acclaimed authors as Junot Diaz and Daniel Alarcon.
    Manuel Muñoz
    Manuel Munoz s dazzling collection is set in a Mexican American neighborhood in central California a place where misunderstandings and secrets shape people s lives From a set of triplets with three distinct fates to a father who places his hope and life savings in the hands of a faith healer, the characters in these stories cross paths in unexpected ways As they do, they reveal a community that is both embracing and unforgiving, and they discover a truth about the nature of home you always live with its history Munoz is an explosive new talent who joins the ranks of such acclaimed authors as Junot Diaz and Daniel Alarcon.Manuel Muoz is the author of one previous story collection, Zigzagger Originally from California, he now lives in New York City.


    Commentaires:

    El
    I picked this book up randomly from the library, not having read any reviews or knowing anyone who had read it, but it turned out to be one of those wonderful and pleasant surprises.These ten short stories are interconnected which is something I like in a book of short stories (and when they're not interconnected my brain tries to connect them anyhow). Taking place in a Mexican-American neighborhood in California, the stories deal primarily with faith - faith in life, faith in family, faith in t [...]

    Nick
    Although most if not all the characters of “The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue” grew up on a single street near Fresno and a number still live there, this is not a book about community, but instead solitude. In the world Munoz presents, families are fragmented and neighbors suspicious, even combative. All these characters are pitted against each other not so much in conflict as in misunderstanding: Mexican and Mexican-American, parent and child, gay and straight, disabled and caretaker, religi [...]

    Christiane
    Phenomenal short story collection, with interesting characters that remind the reader of everyday people. The diatribes of the characters, and how they connect with one another enchant the reader who enjoys Latin American writers and who does not know where to start. The stories are set against a Californian backdrop add a touch of wonder as to how real stories can be, and how much we know about life.

    Katherine
    These short stories are SO GOOD and SO SAD. If I were ever to teach a class on writing short fiction, I would use these as textbook examples of how concrete tactile details can tell your story, and how intensely a writer can make you care for a character in just a few pages. My favorites were probably "Bring Brang Brung" and "Ida y Vuelta", both of which feature gay men in very difficult life situations. As amazing and rich as these stories were, I couldn't read more than one at a time because t [...]

    Maythee
    This collection confirms my feelings that Manuel is either among the best or possibly *the* best Chicano short story writer ever. Carefully crafted stories interweave the lives of young, gay Latino men who don't benefit from the sexual freedoms available to gay men living in larger cities. Set in California's rural central valley, these stories address the limitations that poverty, family responsibilities, provincialism, and cultural expectations have on young men attempting to discover their se [...]

    Dusty
    Someday Manuel Muñoz will write a masterpiece. Like Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, which to my mind sets the standard against which all short story anthologies are judged, Muñoz's Faith Healer of Olive Avenue is a collection of stories that stand independent of each other but involve the same characters. It is set on Gold Street in a hispanic neighborhood in southern California, and each story is narrated from a different neighbor's perspective. There is an old man whose backyard is ov [...]

    Rj
    This book is a collection of ten short stories about Hispanic-Americans living in the valley of Central California. Each short story follows the lives of a character living through pain or trauma and how they deal with the process. It is a wonderful and intimate study of how pain can affect each of us and how we all have different mechanisms for coping with the traumatic events of life. While seemingly disjointed all the stories share the same geographic centre and in the end become a portrait o [...]

    Thurston Hunger
    Can I say he's a fastidious writer, without being a tidy one. The flavors Hispanic and homosexual are strong in this mix, but never that overpowering. I actually started this collection unaware of the author's sexualitybut I think the phrase would be, "Come on Mary" (or is it "Ave Maria?")Anyways, his writing is well-arranged, and the mysterious third key ingredient would be tragedy; not so much for the pain of it, but for the enduring, if not overcoming, of it. There's a lot of different death [...]

    Milan/zzz
    I’ve read this book right after I finished “Drown” by Junot Diaz and somehow as if I was reading (almost) one book. Both are collection of short stories, both are stunning, both dealing with the immigrants (while Diaz writes about immigrants from Dominican Republic in New York/New Jersey, Munoz writes about Mexicans in California). I do think that these two books are great companions indeed.The style is beautifully melancholic (if I’m comparing this is whisper while Diaz is a scream). Th [...]

    Meghan O'Dea
    Munoz presents a dazzling Western version of Winesburg Ohio, giving us glimpses into the intimate lives of the residents in and around Gold Street in a slightly fictionalized version of Fresno. What I liked best about this book is that each of the stories in it ends with a question. There is no resolution here as we are just visitors in these characters' lives. We are left wondering about what happens to them next, perhaps with a sense of what comes next, always satisfied, but with a very realis [...]

    Matt
    It took me a couple stories to get into this, but in the end, I think this is a collection of solid, well-constructed stories. The milieu, of Fresno's working class Mexican neighborhood, and especially the often gay man whose story is set there, was on the one hand new to me, but by the end of the collection, a little limiting. I feel like there are other stories to tell, even if this one is one that's not heard all that often-- maybe six stories, but not twelve in this world.Similarly, all the [...]

    Alisa
    In the title story, the one I liked best, Emilio works the 3rd shift at the paper mill. A pallet of copy paper falls on top of him and crushes his legs. After the accident, his father takes care of him -- wiping him, turning him, lifting him, dragging him. Emilio has no allá. It's more of an 'in here' than an 'over there'. But to his father, he is just as inexplicable and just as disappointing, as the son who goes across the country to mingle among white Americans in a faceless city, to waste a [...]

    Jesse
    I thought I picked up a Latino themed book set in California, but little did I know the types of secrets the description provides. Many of the short stories were about Gay relationships, which was a pleasant surprise for me! I was not expecting that and when I finally figured out that Adrian wasn't just a roommate the story began to make sense. It was refreshing to read about gay Latinos. I also read drown and loved that book as well. Glad to have come across this one.

    Amanda
    This book had potential but just didn't deliver for me. I did appreciate the author's deliberate insertion of previously introduced characters (not just people but locations too, like Gold Street and Avocado Lake) in subsequent stories. The common thread that seemed to bind the stories together did get quite redundant for me, though, and is what stops me from giving this collection any more stars.

    Adan
    Check out the review on my blog at readingsinfronteras. I think the book was great. I wanted to read more stories of the author but this book finished. I will look out for more works on the author. The short stories went into the lives of each character and at times I thought it might be someone in my family. The sadness and humor caught in these pages makes the read a life experience.

    Jonathon Walter
    this book is really something. the emotion is earned in these stories, not just dredged up out of nowhere. nowhere does munoz reach for an effect. everything just happens, without your knowing it. it's pretty incredible. a few of the stories are weaker, but some are near-masterpieces, and one of them ("when you come into your kingdom") is one. wonderful book, one of the best short story collections to come along in a long time.

    Liz Murray
    This collection of interwoven short stories deals mostly with family ties and the heartache of love and loss. They didn't completely take me in but I felt the stories were a cloudy window into the lives of these Latino people living in and around Fresno, CA. I feel that it is probably an honest portrayal and is sensitively written.

    Leslie
    i really enjoyed this book. i like the short story format and especially how all of the lives were weaved together in the end in a "six degrees of separation" sort of way. the stories cover so many complicated issues from romantic to parental relationships, issues of nationality and class. munoz does a good job of making you empathize without letting the characters off the hook.

    Helena
    The majority of these short stories feature the closeted sexuality of gay Latino men, and their relationship to one street in a small Californian town. As the stories unfold, so do the intimacies and secrets of the families in the community. Here and there we see a new side to a character we thought we knew. I might read the beginning again, just to make sure I have it right.

    Andrea
    Fantastic collection of short stories. All set in a town in the valley just outside of Fresno, Munoz makes that small town come alive with his characters, often outsiders due to their sexuality, but sometimes for other reasons too. The writing is taut, not a word wasted, and the feeling of verisimilitude resonates throughout.

    Neil Orts
    Manuel Munoz writes in such a way that you even feel for the characters who are clearly no one you'd want to meet. He has a knack for getting inside the heads of people who might otherwise be the "bad guy" (like the father who drove his son to suicide). No one gets off easy, there are no magical resolutions, everyone pays and we feel the cost. Beautiful writing, deserving of a wider audience.

    Straw
    It's nice to read a book about gay men that doesn't involve clubby white boys with drug problems. This is a book of short stories about hispanic gay men, the closeted and the out.

    Martha
    Wonderful writing from a faculty member at U of A. We do get the typical characters that are popular in literary stories right now, however - mostly all dysfunctional.

    Rebecca
    Read for a college class. I enjoyed this collection of short stories.

    Nathaniel
    so beautiful. i cried.

    Charron
    Only read a few stories in the whole book of shorts.

    Belinda
    Such heartbreakart, well executed. He's one of Viramontes' students.

    Meg
    Well written. But too many stories about parents whose children die - I can't handle that.

    Marissa
    A beautiful writer and a beautiful person. I can't wait for his novel to come out. Suggested.

    Vanessa
    To be honest, I didn't finish it. I should have read this before I read Drown (both books were lent to me at the same time), because I think most anthologies would have been letdowns after Diaz.

    • Free Read [Classics Book] ✓ The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue - by Manuel Muñoz Ê
      380 Manuel Muñoz
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Classics Book] ✓ The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue - by Manuel Muñoz Ê
      Posted by:Manuel Muñoz
      Published :2018-06-07T11:23:05+00:00