æ The Nuclear Age || ☆ PDF Download by ↠ Tim O'Brien


  • Title: The Nuclear Age
  • Author: Tim O'Brien
  • ISBN: 9780394542867
  • Page: 104
  • Format: Hardcover

  • The Nuclear Age is about one man s slightly insane attempt to come to terms with a dilemma that confronts us alla little thing called The Bomb The year is 1995, and William Cowling has finally found the courage to meet his fears head on Cowling s courage takes the form of a hole that he begins digging in his backyard in an effort to bury all thoughts of the apocalypsThe Nuclear Age is about one man s slightly insane attempt to come to terms with a dilemma that confronts us all a little thing called The Bomb The year is 1995, and William Cowling has finally found the courage to meet his fears head on Cowling s courage takes the form of a hole that he begins digging in his backyard in an effort to bury all thoughts of the apocalypse Cowling s wife, however, is ready to leave him his daughter has taken to calling him nutto and Cowling s own checkered past seems to be rising out of the crater taking shape on his lawn, besieging him with flashbacks and memories of a life that s had than its share of turmoil Brilliantly interweaving his masterful storytelling powers with dark, surreal humor and empathy for characters caught in circumstances beyond their control, Tim O Brien brings us his most entertaining novel to date At once wildly comic and sneakily profound, The Nuclear Age is also utterly unforgettable.
    Tim O'Brien
    Tim O Brien matriculated at Macalester College Graduation in 1968 found him with a BA in political science and a draft notice.O Brien was against the war but reported for service and was sent to Vietnam with what has been called the unlucky Americal division due to its involvement in the My Lai massacre in 1968, an event which figures prominently in In the Lake of the Woods He was assigned to 3rd Platoon, A Company, 5th Battalion, 46th Infantry, as an infantry foot soldier O Brien s tour of duty was 1969 70.After Vietnam he became a graduate student at Harvard No doubt he was one of very few Vietnam veterans there at that time, much less Combat Infantry Badge CIB holders Having the opportunity to do an internship at the Washington Post, he eventually left Harvard to become a newspaper reporter O Brien s career as a reporter gave way to his fiction writing after publication of his memoir If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Send Me Home.Tim O Brien is now a visiting professor and endowed chair at Texas State University San Marcos formerly Southwest Texas State University where he teaches in the Creative Writing Program.


    Commentaires:

    Aaron
    On Sunday, May 5th, 2013, the oceanfront town of Lincoln City, OR set a record temperature of 86 degrees. I know, both because I read about it and because I was there. This heat spike, 32 degrees above average, filled an Oregon coast most often described (and rightfully praised) as brooding or atmospheric with more bouncing bikinis than the whole state typically sees in a year. Beach volleyball was played. Bodies were tanned. For a brief, sundazzled flicker, Oregon put on our best California sun [...]

    Brad
    Tim O'Brien's The Nuclear Age isn't a wholly satisfying read, but it's interesting nonetheless. The narrator has a pathological relationship with nuclear weapons, one which drives him from paranoia to terrorism and back to paranoia. This paranoia becomes so pronounced that he even becomes a major threat to his family. This is rather effective, since, told from his perspective, he keeps reassuring the reader that he actually isn't a threat, though his actions clearly show otherwise.Now, as wonky [...]

    Winston
    Tim O’Brien is a polarizing author. The Things They Carried is often cited as the source of his greatest societal disturbance; a fictionalized account of his experiences in Vietnam billed on publication as non-fiction. But also because he’s a hot and cold author, with some books are outstanding and others receiving lukewarm reception.But personally, TTTC is my single favorite book ever. I’ve read it at least 6 times. I remember being assigned a copy in my high school English class and was [...]

    David McDannald
    Salon wrote of Tim O'Brien, that for every masterpiece he'd written there was a corresponding stinker. Unfortunately, The Nuclear Age does not stand up against The Things They Carried, Cacciato, and In the Lake of the Woods. But there is a magical scene within it. The protagonist, as a young boy, is obsessed with nuclear Armageddon and builds a fall-out shelter in the family basement using a ping-pong table. His father comes down into the basement one night and talks the boy through his fear, an [...]

    Melody DeMeritt
    fine writing with an odd plot line. Tim O'Brien, thanks much for your service in Vietnam and for your fine novels about that war. Now you are writing about the opposite character who hid underground and could never make up his mind about what he should do next. Even in the end, thank goodness, he still cannot figure out what to do. Fine writing and you are highly skilled, but this novel misses the mark.

    Tyler
    This isn't as strong as O'Brien's other work; sections of it feel like incomplete drafts, like he left them to be developed later but never got around to actuall doing that. The extended flashback, which takes up most of the novel, is potent and draws big emotions from small brushstrokes, which is typical of O'Brien at his best. The present-day framing device, though, didn't engage me and I thought the wife and daughter characters weren't too convincing.

    Melanie
    Really enjoyed O'Brien's writing style, which unfortunately is the only thing that kept me going through the plodding backflash sections which took up most of the book. At times the dialogue was a bit unbelievable, a tad too witty and rapid-fire. I found the protagonist's choices about the women in his life confusing and at times his decisions and motivations made him hard to care about.

    Cindy
    Tim O'Brien explores the inner thoughts of someone confronting the dawn of the nuclear age. Interesting, but not my favorite O'Brien book (possibly my least favorite - I definitely loved The Things They Carried, enjoyed Going After Cacciato, also enjoyed In the Lake Of the Woods). Maybe I've read too many O'Brien novels and don't find them as interesting now.

    Allison
    5 for his ability to bring the reader into a tailspin, 3 for where the story went.

    Hakan Kemal
    The book is a great history of mans insane attempts to achieve something that has buried us all in the past and in the future.

    Nick
    God damn, this guy can write.

    Timons Esaias
    I'm a big fan of O'Brien, I've taught his work, Things and Into the Lake of the Woods are classics, but I have to admit that this one didn't really work for me.It's well written, and has some wonderful lines ("In a sense, I realized, cheerleaders are terrorists. All that zeal and commitment." "Parents could be absolutely merciless. They just kept coming at you, wearing you down, grinding away until you finally crumbled.") It has valid psychological insights, even amidst the exaggeration and sati [...]

    David
    Strange.

    Int'l librarian
    This is an entertaining and thoughtful book, in spite of all the clunkier shifts in the plot. I like Melanie – she’s a very believable 12-year-old, willing and capable of calling her Dad the loony that he is. And I can sympathize with Dad as the paranoid protagonist. It’s both sensible and sad to witness his breakdown as he struggles to protect his loved ones against the threat of nuclear annihilation. Then again, I’m not so keen about the “listen to the hole” soliloquies. And Mom is [...]

    ACS Librarian
    This is an entertaining and thoughtful book, in spite of all the clunkier shifts in the plot. I like Melanie 13 she 19s a very believable 12-year-old, willing and capable of calling her Dad the loony that he is. And I can sympathize with Dad as the paranoid protagonist. It 19s both sensible and sad to witness his breakdown as he struggles to protect his loved ones against the threat of nuclear annihilation. Then again, I 19m not so keen about the 1Clisten to the hole 1D soliloquies. And Mom is a [...]

    Eric Susak
    The Nuclear Age accomplishes what all great Tim O'Brien books accomplish: it disorients, it places you then warps you, it creates then destroys.It begins with a man obsessed with the nuclear bomb. He's scared of its power and terror and the sound of its voice. Since he was a child, he heard the buzz of nuclear destruction overhead. He built small monuments out of a ping pong table, out of a flight attendant who's out of reach. His motives are so clear because, there it is, the way things are in [...]

    Leigh
    I've always found a coldness at the heart of most O'Brien novels--something slightly detached, almost a little psychotic--but this one felt positively frigid. To a certain extent that's justified: this is, after all, a book about a kind of psychosis.* And O'Brien's prose is as beautiful as ever. But there was something about this book that unnerved me, and not in the good way. An absorbing read, but not an enjoyable one. *See In the Lake of the Woods for an example of where this is used to bette [...]

    Roger DeBlanck
    With a blend of humor and seriousness, O’Brien shows how the possibility of a nuclear catastrophe becomes so real to his main character, William Cowling, that it drives him to extreme paranoia. He begins digging a hole in his backyard to use as a shelter against what he believes is the inevitable day of doom. Although Cowling may depict the hypertension of someone losing his mind, his fears confront the ignorance and negligence of our age’s refusal to acknowledge the potential threat of nucl [...]

    Jessica
    This book was a random pull off the Border's shelf and it turned out to be a pretty good pick. At first I didn't think I would like it because the story seemed like it wasn't going to go anywhere. The first chapter starts out in present time and the main character is digging a hole in his backyard to protect his family from imminent nuclear war -- he is pretty crazy. Most of the novel is a recount of his life after he dodged the draft with his buddies and fellow “terrorists”. One of his budd [...]

    Derek Emerson
    For those familiar with O'Brien's work, you expect a Vietnam novel. While the war is in the book, the main character is actually hiding out from the draft and pulled into an violent, anti-war element. That is told through flashbacks, as the current story follows our protagonist as he builds a bomb shelter in 1995 (although the book came out in 1985). The current story is terrifying as O'Brien puts you in the mind of someone who is ready to kill his family to save them -- you see and understand h [...]

    Matt
    Yet another great book by tim o'brien, about people messed up by Vietnam. In this one however, the main character is pretty nuts before Vietnam, but the war certainly doesn't help anything. The main character is strange and pretty hard to relate to, but once you get used to his neuroses he becomes pretty funny. This is the story of a guy in Montana who goes nuts because he is terrified of bombs and decides to dig a fall out shelter in his back yard. His wife gets pissed and stops talking to him [...]

    Shannah
    I'm a big fan of Tim O'Brien's writing, in particular "The Things They Carried," but this was decidedly a miss. "The Nuclear Age" reads like a 300-page voyage into the heart of human insanity. At times it seems coherent, but mostly it's just one big fever dream. Thank god this novel isn't often taught in English classes because it would be a nightmare to dissect. O'Brien has a talent for writing, obviously, but unfortunately it wasn't evident enough through this particular novel. Dude, try to sh [...]

    Andy
    As well-written as any of Tim O'Brien's works, except this one had a subversive undertone that shook me as the reader. I was a little undone by the relationships between the characters, especially between the narrator and the two principal female characters. The premise was surprisingly imaginative, but the neurotic tendencies of the main character, especially in the interactions with the hole in his back yard and the childhood telephone calls, kind of weirded me out. The story also seemed a lit [...]

    Mikkel
    I had not expected this one to be as good as it is. I saw it as the one I had to get through to read The Things They Carried. But, man, it's so far above what I imagined. From now on there will be no doubting of Tim O'Brien. That man can write like no one else. It's funny how he always seems to circle the same themes and subjects but his voice can be so different in different books. William Cowling is one of the most interesting creations I've ever encountered. Definitely 4.5 with a view to 5 so [...]

    Yves
    Ce livre raconte de manière humoristique la vie d'un homme paranoïaque dont la plus grande peur est une guerre nucléaire. L'auteur remonte jusqu'à la jeunesse du personnage en passant par son adolescence solitaire et sa fuite pour échapper à la guerre du Viet-Nam.J'ai adoré la première moitié du roman mais je me suis emmerdé durant la seconde moitié. La jeunesse du personnage principal était vraiment bien monté. Ça se gâche lorsqu'il fuit la guerre. J'ai vraiment perdu tout intér [...]

    Kevin Summers
    Sample quote: "Is it uncouth to speak plainly? Nuclear war--am I out of key with my times? An object of pity? Am I comic? Here, now, digging, my wife and daughter locked away, the hole egging me on, am I crazy to extrapolate doom from the evidence all around me. Minuteman and Backfire, a world stockpiled with 60,000 warheads? Are the numbers too bald, too clumsy? Am I indiscreet to say it? Nuclear war."

    Carrie
    I could not finish this book and I normally love Tim O'Brien's writing. I think another reviewer said it best: "ceaseless." This story just hammers away at you ceaselessly. The dialog doesn't work. The effort to establish the narrator as crazy goes overboard. It's just too much. I think this is one of O'Brien's first and I can say with certainty that he improved in later books. O'Brien tries too hard to deal with too many subjects at once, here.

    Shawna
    Ugh, I had to put it down after the first three chapters.Such a masculine point of view. The main character was not at all sympathetic to me, I mean he describes his blond wife and daughter as "assets" at one point. I guess if you are into/can identify with that sort of man-boy angst this would be great. If that isn't your cup of tea then pass this over in favor of something else.Now I know what it feels like to be a guy and try to read Twilight.

    Carrie
    I could not finish this book and I normally love Tim O'Brien's writing. I think another reviewer said it best: "ceaseless." This story just hammers away at you ceaselessly. The dialog doesn't work. The effort to establish the narrator as crazy goes overboard. It's just too much. I think this is one of O'Brien's first and I can say with certainty that he improved in later books. O'Brien tries too hard to deal with too many subjects at once, here.

    Denae
    In a departure from Tim O'Brien's other works, The Nuclear Age follows the path and experience of an individual who chose to avoid going to Vietnam and ultimately participated in guerilla training for a resistance movement. It is as moving as O'Brien's other books and well worth seeking out to read.

    • æ The Nuclear Age || ☆ PDF Download by ↠ Tim O'Brien
      104 Tim O'Brien
    • thumbnail Title: æ The Nuclear Age || ☆ PDF Download by ↠ Tim O'Brien
      Posted by:Tim O'Brien
      Published :2018-08-17T16:58:09+00:00