Free Read [Ebooks Book] ☆ The Englishman's Boy - by Guy Vanderhaeghe Û


  • Title: The Englishman's Boy
  • Author: Guy Vanderhaeghe
  • ISBN: 9780771086922
  • Page: 216
  • Format: Paperback

  • The Englishman s Boy brilliantly links together Hollywood in the 1920s with one of the bloodiest, most brutal events of the nineteenth century Canadian West the Cypress Hills Massacre Vanderhaeghe s rendering of the stark, dramatic beauty of the western landscape and of Hollywood in its most extravagant era with its visionaries, celebrities, and dreamers provides viThe Englishman s Boy brilliantly links together Hollywood in the 1920s with one of the bloodiest, most brutal events of the nineteenth century Canadian West the Cypress Hills Massacre Vanderhaeghe s rendering of the stark, dramatic beauty of the western landscape and of Hollywood in its most extravagant era with its visionaries, celebrities, and dreamers provides vivid background for scenes of action, adventure, and intrigue Richly textured, evocative of time and place, this is an unforgettable novel about power, greed, and the pull of dreams that has at its centre the haunting story of a young drifter the Englishman s boy whose fate, ultimately, is a tragic one.From the Hardcover edition.
    Guy Vanderhaeghe
    Guy Clarence Vanderhaeghe, OC, SOM is a Canadian fiction author.Vanderhaeghe received his Bachelor of Arts degree with great distinction in 1971, High Honours in History in 1972 and Master of Arts in History in 1975, all from the University of Saskatchewan In 1978 he received his Bachelor of Education with great distinction from the University of Regina In 1973 he was Research Officer, Institute for Northern Studies, University of Saskatchewan and, from 1974 until 1977, he worked as Archival and Library Assistant at the university From 1975 to 1977 he was a freelance writer and editor and in 1978 and 1979 taught English and history at Herbert High School in Herbert, Saskatchewan In 1983 and 1984 he was Writer in Residence with the Saskatoon Public Library and in 1985 Writer in Residence at the University of Ottawa He has been a Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Ottawa 1985 86 , faculty member of the Writing Program of the Banff Centre for the Arts 1990 91 , faculty member in charge of senior fiction students in the SAGE Hills Creative Writing Program 1992 Since 1993 he has served as a visiting professor of English at St Thomas More College at the University of Saskatchewan.Vanderhaeghe lives with his wife in Saskatoon.Vanderhaeghe s first book, Man Descending selected stories 1982 , was winner of a Governor General s Award and the United Kingdom s Faber Prize A novel, The Englishman s Boy 1996 , won him a second Governor General s Award for Fiction and the Saskatchewan Book Award for Fiction and for Best Book of the Year, and it was shortlisted for both the Giller Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.He is perhaps best known for The Last Crossing 2001 , a national bestseller and winner of the Saskatoon Book Award, the Saskatchewan Book Awards for Fiction and for Book of the Year, and the Canadian Booksellers Association Libris Award for Fiction Book of the Year The novel was selected for the 2004 edition of Canada Reads as the book that should be read by all Canadians.In 2003, Vanderhaeghe was awarded the Saskatchewan Order of Merit and was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.


    Commentaires:

    Burd
    Many times you start reading a book and as you get into it, as you get to connect with the dialogue and the characters, becoming more and more interested in the outcome of the story, you end up liking the book. Other times you pick up a book expecting something based on a review or an interesting premise but at some point it starts to drag or become repeditive or predictable and you are disappointed. Occasionally you pick up a book and from the very first page you can tell this book is so far ab [...]

    Maureen
    the englishman's boy is part western, and part early hollywood tale, exploring how we interpret civilization and savagery in our personal thoughts and action, and how that is reflected in the rest of society. it does so by recounting two stories: one of the titular character, drifting through the west, earning his guns, and his horse, becoming a man and a cowboy; and it is also the story of a writer who is looking to record the story of that cowboy, in early hollywood, to fulfill somebody else's [...]

    Jim
    We Canadians are a mild lot much so that even our Indian massacres are mild affairs with low body counts and a minimum of fuss. This book is centred around the Cypress Hills massacre, a pretty tame affair when compared to the massive episodes of bloodletting that occurred with some regularity south of the border. In the USA it would probably be listed as a skirmish, but I'll bet none of that was any consolation to the unfortunate Assiniboine who were being set upon by (mostly) American hunters. [...]

    Geoff
    A clever, harsh, and poignant treatment of American frontier myth. The author was clearly no stranger to the name Frederick Jackson Turner. The setting is great, and the contrast between Hollywood and the west all the more interesting. There is no doubt here who the savages are, and where the barbarism is, and if that's not made clear enough, the undertones of rising fascism and growing paranoia make it clear. A colorful, wonderful and broad book.

    Marlene
    Wow, what a horrific part of our Canadian history! Although this book was fiction, I appreciated Vanderhaeghe's efforts to raise awareness of the Cyphress Hills Massacre in 1873 (which I did not know beforehand). The twinning of the 2 stories (the massacre in 1873 and the Hollywood silent movie studio 50 years later) was brilliant and effective. Added to this, I applaud the CBC mini-series also written by Vanderhaeghe. It was great seeing the author in his cameo as the bartender. Both the book a [...]

    Graeme Stuart Waymark
    Excellent Canadian historical novel, thoroughly researched with the added flavor of the early momentum of Hollywood as Cinema moved from status of 'has beens', 'wanna-be', second rate to stage, and for the non-erudite, illiterate, English as Second language (Immigrant) to a powerful voice in America and the profession of not only the rich and famous but the influential. Most compelling about the reading is the examination through recorded history of the aboriginal/indians, the various tribes, an [...]

    rabbitprincess
    I have the CBC to thank for turning me on to this wonderful book. Earlier this year, they aired a jaw-droppingly brilliant adaptation of it as a two-part miniseries. Guy Vanderhaeghe himself adapted it, so I came to the book confident that the story had held up well.Indeed it had. The story is told in mostly alternating chapters, shifting between the late 1880s (or thereabouts) and the early 1930s (pre-Second World War, at any rate). The past storyline is about a young man, known only as "the En [...]

    Maggie Donaldson
    Wow, this was such a great book. Vanderhaeghe is a master of descriptive narrative - you can almost smell and feel the atmosphere, especially in the 'historical' parts of the book concerning the wolfers and the build towards the shocking events at Cypress Hills. at the same time, the parallel story of 1920s Hollywood is believable and atmospheric. I want to read much more by this author - apparently, he teaches creative writing at nightschool in Saskatchewan. Lucky pupils - a master writer. Just [...]

    HomeInMyShoes
    Quite an entertaining and well put together story. The intertwined current versus past and the dual storylines of character development were really good. A highly recommended author from my home country.

    Anita
    It took until page 65 to be totally drawn ine writing is wonderful.

    Gail
    This novel comes up often during discussion in my classes: Guy has done so many things right.

    Sarah
    I really like this book. It has a very interesting storyline. In fact, Englishman's Boy includes three storylines that are all intertwined. Firstly, there are two Assiniboine Indians stealing some horses from white men in 1873.Secondly, there is the young Englishman´s Boy whose real name is never given and who joins the white men whose horses were stolen in their chase of the Indians all the way up to Canada. (+ includes a retelling of the Cypress Hills massacre in 1873)Thirdly, there is an old [...]

    Tracey
    If Westerns are your thing, this is a phenomenally written Western and while I only give it 3 stars, it's because Westerns are not my thing. I find the intricate detail of life in the wide open space to be rather tiring and I read this for a book club so in my mind I was duty-bound to finish it. The book fluctuates between 1920s Hollywood and the real old West of about 30-40 years prior. While I was slightly more interested in the Hollywood era, I really never warmed to the characters. As I ment [...]

    Tony
    I loved this novel for its compelling portrayal of life in the unsettled Canadian west at the turn of the century, for its sustained tension and dark secrets, and for the rendition of the main characters and how they view the world around them in connection with the past. Through experiences, memories, and dialogue we are given a very vivid picture of two distant historical periods. Bonus points for it being set in the Cypress Hills, where I currently live.

    Pamela
    (view spoiler)[Yes it is amazing. Beautiful and painfully told. And so it ENDS."He was very near now, his heart big in his breast with pride as the blue horse flew into the surprised eyes of the people, moving like a snow squall too strong strong for the hot sun to melt. When he reined in behind Broken Horn, the winter horse did not hesitate, but kept moving, head carried high, ears prickled as he trotted by all those who had fallen into silence, awed by the picture he made. Even the jaws of the [...]

    Buffy
    One of the most depressing books I have ever read, bleak but lovely.

    Hanna Municipal Library
    This book club discussion had four attending with 23 reading along. The group had a difficult time with the duality of the story line. Many felt that the book was a bit of a challenge to get in to. The two story lines were done in such a way as to be distracting.The historical aspect of the piece did draw some. One participant was so drawn by it they looked up more information on the massacre.Overall, most participants would not recommend the book. It was an interesting novel to read, once you g [...]

    Dale
    loaned to me by my dentist (someone dropped it off, thinking it was hers); the counter balancing stories of two men, one the villianous western (madman); the other attempting to tell the villians story for a movie. Initially a bit confusing, eventually it all came to make sense and became very intense towards the end; the end saved the day; 1996 hardback, 333 pages

    Jennifer Gaudet
    I couldn't stop reading it despite it being a tad depressing. Engaging read

    Linda Fallows
    Tedious and confusing.

    Robin Friedman
    The Canadian writer Guy Vanderhaeghe's "The Englishman's Boy"(1996) consists of two story lines woven together, mostly effectively. The first story is set in the Hollywood of the 1920s and is narrated in the first person by Harry Vincent, a young wandering man from Canada who finds employment as a writer at a studio. The second story is set in the United States and Canadian west of the 1870's. It is told in a halting narrative in the third person. The story is about a group of wolf trappers who [...]

    Kyle B
    After reading Daddy Lenin and Other Stories earlier this year, I was captivated by Guy Vanderhaeghe's mastery of storytelling. As I'm a big fan of historical fiction, I knew before the year was out that I'd have to transport myself back a couple of decades and give this one, which one the Governor General's Award in 1996, a try.His flare for storytelling is immediately obvious in The Englishman's Boy. A winding, tragic story that spans 50 years, Vanderhaeghe manages to build rich characters that [...]

    Dale White
    The Englishman's Boy by Guy Vanderhaeghe is a fictionalized account of the Cypress Hills Massacre which took place in what is now Saskatchewan in 1873 when a group of American buffalo hunters and wolfers cross the Canadian border chasing after some stolen horses. The story is told through the eyes of a servant (the Englishman's boy) who has joined the hunters after his boss has died. Vanderhaeghe does a good job of describing the characters who make up this lot and their feelings as they approac [...]

    Sarah
    Started off thinking this was the most brilliant thing I'd read in ages but actually it isn't - still pretty good though. Split between a posse of the 1870s and the glittering Hollywood set of the 1920s - the former much better than the latter, where in particular the voices are inauthentic (I don't think 'shut the fuck up' was quite the thing even among film people, in 1923). There are curious listings (in dialogue) of Hollywood scandals and starlets, which is very artificial, and a bit of the [...]

    Linda
    I didn't expect to like this book. I had read a review of Vanderhaeghe's newest in this Western trilogy and decided I might give it a try. But I believe I should go back and read the first book first, no matter how good the current one seems.So I got it from the library. First of all I don't like the title. After reading it, I understand it, but I still don't like it. That was the first put-off. The second was that the "real" story started in 1920s Los Angeles with the movie industry. A western [...]

    Biju Bhaskar
    This book spans events separated by 50 years. The first tale is about a young boy called the Englishman's Boy because he enters the tale as the personal servant of an Englishman who visits America in the mid of the 19th century to hunt buffaloes. Though the Englishman succumbs to illness early in the tale, the protagonist is still called the 'Englishman's Boy'. He falls in with a group of wolf hunters who are in search of the Assiniboine Indians who stole their horses. The group is lead by a qui [...]

    Czarny Pies
    This is a great book for anyone who simply does not enjoy reading history but wants a great story about one of the many shocking massacres of Indian settlements during the glorious era when the West was won. The Englishman's boy tells the story of how a young teenager gets recruited into the posse of American and Canadian whisky traders that massacred 24 Indian women and children in the Cypress Hills of Saskatchewan in 1873. As history this book is very good. As a novel, it stretches things too [...]

    Jeff Rowe
    It started off strong. But then the Englishman dies right at the beginning. He was shaping up to be an excellent character. The whole Hollywood angle is what ruined it for me with the alternating chapters. I never really cared much for Harry, the writer character. He gets converted from a jaded Hollywood hack to an idealist after a few minutes with the spoiled rich studio owner? Come on, dude. Or even for the cowboy for that matter. I mean what was he even doing in Hollywood in the first place i [...]

    Derek Baker
    I was disappointed by this one. Vanderhaeghe has real talent for writing a western story, but this one, centered around the 1873 Cypress Hills Massacre in Saskatchewan, is ruined by it's side by side presentation with the story of its Hollywood re-making. The young boy in the western story is hunted down as an old man so a Hollywood producer with a sinister purpose can extract and then mangle his story.The "original" story and the "making of" story are presented in alternating chapters, and the [...]

    Trina
    With alternating chapters that overlap the Wild West frontier with early Hollywood glitz, this novel tries to tell the story of a mysterious old cowboy whose life has the makings of the next great American film--if only he can be found. You'd think this would have been terrific - and I wanted it to be since Guy Vanderhaeghe writes beautifully and creates vivid, sympathetic characters. But I couldn't get into this novel the way I did The Crossing, which also takes place in the Canadian and Americ [...]

    • Free Read [Ebooks Book] ☆ The Englishman's Boy - by Guy Vanderhaeghe Û
      216 Guy Vanderhaeghe
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Ebooks Book] ☆ The Englishman's Boy - by Guy Vanderhaeghe Û
      Posted by:Guy Vanderhaeghe
      Published :2019-02-02T02:50:31+00:00