[PDF] Ç Unlimited ☆ Still Life with Oysters and Lemon: On Objects and Intimacy : by Mark Doty ê


  • Title: Still Life with Oysters and Lemon: On Objects and Intimacy
  • Author: Mark Doty
  • ISBN: 9780807066096
  • Page: 249
  • Format: Paperback

  • Although at first glance this slim volume appears to be a quick read, it should be lingered over and reread to uncover the full depth of its beauty and insight Combining memoir with artistic and philosophical musings, the poet and National Book Critics Circle Award winner for My Alexandria begins by confessing his obsession with the 17th century Dutch still life that seAlthough at first glance this slim volume appears to be a quick read, it should be lingered over and reread to uncover the full depth of its beauty and insight Combining memoir with artistic and philosophical musings, the poet and National Book Critics Circle Award winner for My Alexandria begins by confessing his obsession with the 17th century Dutch still life that serves as the title of this book As he analyzes the items depicted in the painting, he skillfully introduces his thoughts on our intimate relationships to objects and subsequently explains how they are often inextricably bound to the people and places of an individual lifetime Further defined by imperfections attained from use, each object from an aging oak table to a chipped blue and white china platter forms a springboard for reflection Doty intersperses personal reminiscences throughout, but he always returns to the subject of still life painting and its silent eloquence Doty s observations on balance, grief, beauty, space, love, and time are imparted with wisdom and poetic grace.Books like this, that address the sources of creation and the sources of our humanness, come along once in a decade Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times This small book is as wise, sensitive, intense, and affecting as anything I have read in recent years Doris Grumbach, author of Fifty Days of Solitude A gem Library Journal Mark Doty s prose is insistently exploratory, yet every aside, every detour, turns into pertinence, and it all seems effortless, as though the author were wondering, and marveling, aloud Bernard Cooper, author of Truth Serum A dazzling accomplishment, its radiance bred of lucid attention and acute insight The subject is the profoundly personal act of perception translated into description Doty succeeds in rendering this most contemplative of arts the still life into a riveting drama Patricia Hampl, author of I Could Tell You Stories
    Mark Doty
    Mark Doty is the author of six books of poems and two memoirs, Heaven s Coast and Firebird A Guggenheim, Ingram Merrill, and Whiting Fellow, he has also received the National Book Critics Circle Award and the PEN Martha Albrand Prize for Nonfiction He teaches at the University of Houston, and divides his time between Houston and Provincetown, Massachusetts.


    Commentaires:

    Sue
    As I read this book, it gradually evolved from an interesting to arresting work, from writing to poetry, to art. I've never really loved still life as much as I enjoy other types of visual arts. Through this piece I've learned a new respect for still life and now can look at them through new eyes. Through this, there are also new ways to look at life.Mark Doty has a skill for clarifying meaning so well and for using language skillfully and beautifully. The poet shows even in the prose. I have to [...]

    Zenmoon
    This book is notable for me for a couple of reasons, firstly, due to it being the first e-book I’ve read - such is my favoring of print, and secondly, because Mark Doty, so unexpectedly, swept me off my feet with his exquisite poetic prose. I don’t think I’ve read a book quite like this, remarkable in its ability to compress so much profundity into so small a place, and to have it flow with such elegance and grace. Every sentence seemed to demand of me a pause for reflection. This man posi [...]

    Fostergrants
    When I started reading this book I got a few pages into it and stopped caring what it was about. It did not matter as long as I could keep a steady stream of his words pouring into my brain. I can imagine even his grocery lists are beautifully written and make your mouth water, satisfying your appetite without the need to go to the store. This is a small book and he does not waste space with unecessary speech. Each sentence has an impact and the result was that I read slowly and did not really t [...]

    Rosana
    Last night I sat down with a glass of wine and Still Life with Oysters and Lemon, by the poet Mark Doty. I read it in one go and a second glass of wine. I really don’t have words to describe the experience of reading it. Any attempt to express it seems shallow after Doty’s beautifully crafted prose. I will only say that it has been a long time since I read a book that spoke so deeply to me, but this phrase also seems shallow and clichéd. Yet, speak to me it did. This book defies genre, and [...]

    John
    I picked this one up after enjoying Doty's memoir Firebird, so I knew he could write well, and Still Life is one of my favorite art forms, always leaving me with a feeling of "How did they do that!" In this piece, he successfully integrates discussion of the technique with examples of items from his own life that have had sentimental value. Tough to explain, but that doesn't matter as you really need to just read Doty's words for yourself! Don't be fooled by the short length of the book, however [...]

    AC
    Perhaps this type of writing is an acquired taste. It is not, at any rate, a taste I have ever acquired. It has very little to do with art or with painting or with the Dutch - it is subjective (and hence, quite arbitrary) and self-indulgent, and much of it taken up with rather uninteresting memories of his old aunts in Tennessee. It is about mood, and not insight. Just my opinion, of course.

    Lex
    very short, very lovely. reminded me a lot of the goldfinch, it talks about a lot of similar themes but it's a very different kind of book

    Monica
    I got off to s slow start with this essay but warmed to Doty’s childhood remembrances of his grandmother and then found his writing easier to follow. Purchasing an old house, shopping flea markets and collecting… more interesting to most of my friends than having everything brand new. One friend has a cultural mind set to not have anything used by another human being. Not even a chair. I find this very odd. I enjoy layers of meaning and history. Ownership brings joy but also holds a double-e [...]

    Kasey Jueds
    I read this gorgeous little book very slowly, because I wanted to savor all of it. It amazed me how seamlessly Mark Doty's writing moves from considering still lifes (not a type of art I was especially interested in until I read this book) to remembering fragments of his own history to pondering--deeply, surprisingly--enormous topics like art and death and the relationship between the two. He also considers the life of objects--what and how they mean, why we cherish them and what they can teach [...]

    Jen
    This book is exquisite. This bit of prose is partly autobiographical - dealing with the loss of his long-time partner, learning how to negotiate between commitment and freedom; partly a rumination on the genre of still life and how we identify with material objects in our everyday lives (I have a new found appreciation for those old Dutch scenes and even the odds and ends in my own house). Doty is a poet, primarily, so the whole text is infused with beautiful language. Dawn got this for me for C [...]

    Aran
    Beautiful. If it gets a little precious, whimsical, or far-reaching at times, that's fine. I'll allow him that. Because it's beautiful.

    Andrea
    This non-fiction book is about the power of objects, and mostly about the power of still lifes in capturing the power of objects. It is a beautifully and thoughtfully written book, both intensely personal in its chronicling of the loss of one long-term partner and the beginning of his new (and still current) long term love, and the place objects, art, furniture and other ornaments played in those relationships, as objects of beauty and triggers and receptacles for memory. But beyond the personal [...]

    D.
    One of the best books I have read yet."Now I think there is a space inside me that is like the dark inside that hollow sphere, and things float up into view, images that are vessels of meaning, the flotsam and detail of any particular moment. Vanished things. Or vanished from my life, at least. Who knows where they might be now, to what use they may have been put, what other meanings have been assigned to them?" p. 26"The still life's movement toward simplicity comes to its oddest--perhaps inevi [...]

    A.
    I’m a bit disappointed.Doty writing style is poetry no doubt, but I expected the whole book to be about paintings and art. It’s too personal.It appears to me that this book is Doty’s special way to express grief or deal with death.I liked some of his reflections on still life paintings even though I differ with them.“It is at the eyes of a portrait always, that our seeing stops. But in still life, there is no end to our looking.” I on the other hand, see endless world in the eyes of a [...]

    Rick
    Best known as a poet, Doty is also a writer of sublime prose, as witness his memoir Heaven’s Coast and this fine book-length essay on Dutch still life paintings. Doty’s eye and ear are finely tuned, making his observations about the paintings, beginning with the title one by Jan Davidsz de Heem, not just insightful but memorable. Doty interweaves the personal with his responses to the works he is considering. Musing about mortality and life’s continuance for others, Doty describes his mour [...]

    Mary K
    "We are instructed by the objects that come to speak with us, those material presences. Why should we have been born knowing how to love the world? We require, again and again, these demonstrations." p. 10A kind book, in the same way that "Pictures and Tears: A History of People Who Have Cried in Front of Paintings" is a kind title, or that object-oriented ontology is a kind proposition. "I live in a capital of light," Doty writes, implying that how he engages optics--or how the light he pulls h [...]

    DoctorM
    A wonderful, gentle, deeply moving little book. Perfect for a mid-December night with a glass of wine. Doty begins with a small painting on view at the Met, a 17th-c. Dutch still life in all its rich, deep colours and textures. And from there he moves to his own memories of childhood and loss and the small tangible items that we use to hold on to our memories. He quotes from a favourite poem of mine, one by C.P. Cavafy that sketches the half-empty room where the poet spent long sunlit afternoons [...]

    Alex
    Well, the Amherst English department is batting 1.000 right nowDoty's a bloody genius. Too bad more authors don't adapt this 70-ish-page essay / narrative / philosophy / criticism format. It works well, much better than forcing an idea into some preconceived notion (with a corresponding length) of a proper novel or poem or whatever.Tons of great quotations in the book, but you can't beat the last three pages, especially:"What we are is attention, a quick physical presence in the world, a bright [...]

    Philippe
    Despite some ravishing prose, this short meditation on the wonders of Dutch Golden Age still life painting wasn't able to capture my imagination. Or it did, but then in a negative sense. There's something in this book that really annoyed me, and it is hard to put the finger on it. Maybe it's simply that Doty's admiration for representations of oysters and lemons is an alibi to extemporise on other, more carnal pleasures. That is perfectly legitimate, of course, but it's rather removed from what [...]

    Cindy
    I participate in my life more completely after reading this book. Contemplating the intimate process of creating and looking at paintings, reading and reflecting on well-chosen words, or thinking, over and over, "that may be the most beautifully crafted sentence or paragraph I've ever read," are gifts I got from this book. I couldn't read it quickly, even though it is short. I would have missed out on too much.

    Martin
    An exquisite and almost devastating rumination on life, death, and the gestures that help us make sense of "memory's theater". I haven't read his poetry (yet) but this is exceptionally lucid prose, biographical or otherwise. Doty says that "when we describe the world we come closer to saying what we are" and then proceeds to tell us, with impressive richness and clarity, how he sees. Given his poet's eyes the journey is remarkable.

    Randal
    This tasty bonbon of a book is, in essence, a love letter to a painting. Yet Mark Doty does more than exquisitely describe Osias Beert's artwork. He also draws conclusions about beauty and the objects we see (or ignore) in our daily lives.I checked this book out of the library, and before I was even finished with it, I had ordered a copy online. That's how much I enjoyed it.

    Jackie
    What are the odds of reading two five-star books back-to-back? This one defies description. I stopped half-way through so I could order a personal copy. When it comes, I will re-read it and highlight the many places I was unable to mark in the library copy.

    Erin
    Beautiful and dreamy. "We are instructed by the objects that come to speak with us, those material presences. Why should we have been born knowing how to love the world? We require, again and again, these demonstrations."

    Adriana
    Un libro sobre la mirada: el poeta escribe mirando un cuadro con el mismo amor y atención con que el pintor miró el mundo que pintaba. Muy lindo todo. El primer 5 estrellitas de mi año.

    Jude
    This is an exquisite small book of memoir + musings to be savored very slowly, like a Chateau d'Yquem.

    C
    A highly poeticized take on the role of the still life -- made more meaningful by having read Doty's previous memoirs.

    Carrie
    Read this on my couch-bound, flu-filled weekend, and it still managed to make everything around me seem exquisitely beautiful.

    Abby
    Beautiful reflections on life, death, and a Dutch painting that stirred Mark Doty's heart and mind. I just love him so much. In my book, he can do no wrong!

    Carol
    What an excellent book! I will be giving this book as a gift to many of my family & friends.

    • [PDF] Ç Unlimited ☆ Still Life with Oysters and Lemon: On Objects and Intimacy : by Mark Doty ê
      249 Mark Doty
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      Posted by:Mark Doty
      Published :2018-07-05T18:05:22+00:00